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Pediatric Kidney Disease

There are two types of kidney disease: Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Impaired kidney function alters the child’s energy, protein, fluid, electrolyte, and vitamin/mineral needs. The standard of care is to provide adequate nutrition to support growth and development, while carefully managing blood levels of electrolytes, vitamins and minerals for medical safety as excess accumulation or deficiencies may occur1. Specialized nutrition, including medical formula is needed and nutrition requirements are individualized and frequently adjusted based on laboratory data and growth.

Dietary management is complex and should be individualized with a focus on:2

  1. Energy intake: poor appetite, food refusal, nausea and vomiting are common.
  2. Protein intake: careful monitoring and regulation of protein is needed to achieve optimal growth.
  3. Fluid and electrolytes: requirements and potential restrictions will vary depending upon the needs of the individual.
  4. Ensuring adequate and not excessive micronutrient intake.

Dietary management is dependent upon many factors, and typically a specialized multidisciplinary pediatric renal team develops and updates the individualized plan of care.

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Pediatric Kidney Disease

There are two types of kidney disease: Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Impaired kidney function alters the child’s energy, protein, fluid, electrolyte, and vitamin/mineral needs. The standard of care is to provide adequate nutrition to support growth and development, while carefully managing blood levels of electrolytes, vitamins and minerals for medical safety as excess accumulation or deficiencies may occur1. Specialized nutrition, including medical formula is needed and nutrition requirements are individualized and frequently adjusted based on laboratory data and growth.

Dietary management is complex and should be individualized with a focus on:2

  1. Energy intake: poor appetite, food refusal, nausea and vomiting are common.
  2. Protein intake: careful monitoring and regulation of protein is needed to achieve optimal growth.
  3. Fluid and electrolytes: requirements and potential restrictions will vary depending upon the needs of the individual.
  4. Ensuring adequate and not excessive micronutrient intake.

Dietary management is dependent upon many factors, and typically a specialized multidisciplinary pediatric renal team develops and updates the individualized plan of care.

Discover More

Pediatric Kidney Disease
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1. KDOQI Clinical Practice Guideline for Nutrition in Children with CKD: 2008 Update. 2009.
2. Royle J. Chapter 12: Kidney Disease. In: Shaw V, editor. Clinical Paediatric Dietetics. 4: John Wiley & Sons Ltd.; 2015. p. 242-81.